Knowing About Others: On "The Role of Relational Knowing in Advance Care Planning"

Jamie Lindemann Nelson

Kate Robins-Browne and her colleagues have written a conceptually daring, empirically grounded article that is rich in scholarship and just conceivably might have a salutary effect on the theory and practice of advance care planning. It is, alas, just as easy to believe that its appreciation will be restricted to like-minded theorists. Writing from a posture of great admiration for this article’s agenda and achievements, I will consider why non-relationally-based understanding of deciding for others are so enduring, and what might be done about that.

 

 

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